95% Of Serotonin Is Produced In The Gut

What is the gut:

It refers to the Gastro Intestinal tract, which is a series of hollow organs joined in a long, twisting tube from the mouth to the anus. The hollow organs that make up the GI tract are the mouth, oesophagus, stomach, small intestine, large intestine, and anus.

What are the benefits of having a healthy gut?

95% of your serotonin is produced in the gut

Serotonin is a chemical produced naturally that affects the way you feel, for example, making you feel happier, calmer, and less hungry.

A whopping 95% of serotonin is produced by the intestine in your gut! This highlights the importance of gut health in the way you feel. Want to feel happier? Improving your gut health may help!

70% of the immune system is in the gut

Our immune systems are what keep us fit and well against fungi, viruses, bacteria, and other outside invaders.

70% of our immune system is located in the gut! The gut isn’t just a very important part of the body for staying healthy and preventing illness, infection and inflammation, but also lets us know when things are wrong with indicators such as bowel problems and stomach cramps.

 Digest food better

Some of the main benefits for the gut with better food digestion:

  • Metabolism will become healthier
  • Digest nutrients better, vitamins and minerals
  • Better portion control
  • Good for weight Loss

 50% of dopamine is produced in the gut

Dopamine plays a role in how we feel pleasure. It's a big part of our unique human ability to think and plan. It helps us strive, focus, and find things interesting.

How can we make our gut healthier

Fibre is your friend

Fibre helps plays a huge role in creating a diverse biome of bacteria in your gut.

Some beneficial gut enhancing foods are sweet potatoes, spinach, beetroot, carrots and fennel. Most fruit and vegetables are a great sources of fibre and vitamins.

You could also try introducing more whole grains if you want to increase your fibre, for example, swap white bread, rice and oats for brown bread, porridge and rice.

Eat probiotic rich foods

Probiotics are thought to help restore the natural balance of bacteria in your gut. Some great sources of probiotics are mainly fermented foods like yogurt, kimchi, sauerkraut and kombucha.

Sleep

Make sure you’re getting a healthy amount of sleep. The average recommendation is 7-8 hours per night. Top tip, take lie ins on the weekend to make up for lost hours from busy weeks.

Less stress

Stress and the gut are directly correlated. The next time you are stressed stop and take a second to notice how your stomach is feeling. Butterflies, ulcers and an unsettled stomach are all examples of how your gut is impacted by stress.

Decrease alcohol

Excessive alcohol consumption is bad for your gut as it causes inflammation and wipes out a lot of the gut biome. Some symptoms of this could be heartburn, consistent discomfort, ulcers and bacterial infections.

 

 

Sources

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5526216/ 95% of your serotonin is produced in the gut

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/probiotics/

https://www.nhs.uk/live-well/eat-well/digestive-health/

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Klinder A, Shen Q, Heppel S, Lovegrove JA, Rowland I, Tuohy KM. Impact of increasing fruit and vegetables and flavonoid intake on the human gut microbiotaFood & Function. 2016;7(4):1788-1796.

Vitamin K. NIH Office of Dietary Supplements. Accessed 5/12/2021.

Grizotte-Lake M, Zhong G, Duncan K, et al. Commensals Suppress Intestinal Epithelial Cell Retinoic Acid Synthesis to Regulate Interleukin-22 Activity and Prevent Microbial DysbiosisImmunity. 2018;49(6).

Wassermann B, Müller H and Berg G. An Apple a Day: Which Bacteria Do We Eat With Organic and Conventional Apples? Front. Microbiol. 2019;10:1629.

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https://www.nm.org/healthbeat/healthy-tips/7-reasons-to-listen-to-your-gut

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